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    German Chancellor considers prolonging nuclear power plant activity


    August 3, 2022 - CE Noticias Financieras

     

      Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany- German Chancellor Olaf Scholz said on Wednesday (3/8) that "it could make sense" to extend the operation of the last three active nuclear power plants in Germany, a country that suffers especially from a shortage of Russian gas and that fears an energy crisis.

      These plants "are only suitable for the production of electricity and only a small part of it," but "it could make sense to keep them open," the head of government considered.

      Germany had planned to abandon nuclear power production by the end of 2022.

      However, the reduction in Russian gas supplies to Germany has brought back to the forefront the question of keeping the last plants of the type in operation for longer than expected.

      Berlin must decide in the coming weeks on a possible extension of the plants' service life, depending on what the experts analyzing the situation consider at the moment.

      As soon as the results of the "stress test" are known, "we will draw our conclusions," the chancellor said during a visit to Mülheim an der Ruhr (west).

      The three nuclear power plants still in operation - in Bavaria, Lower Saxony, and Baden-Württemberg - currently contribute 6 percent of Germany's net electricity production.

      The issue of extending use divides the governing coalition: the Greens are skeptical, Olaf Scholz's Social Democratic Party so far reserved, and the liberals of the FDP are in favor.

      The implementation of the new power plants, which are supposed to replace nuclear power and coal, is slower than expected and very uneven in the different regions of the country.

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